Revisiting ‘Broken Shield’

This story from the Center for Investigative Reporting follows up on a 2012 investigation into the failures on the part of police to protect the developmentally disabled at California care institutions. The original series, Broken Shield, won the inaugural Katherine Schneider Journalism Award for Excellence in Reporting on Disability, the annual award of the National Center on Disability and Journalism.

13 deaths blamed on abuse and neglect at California state-run homes

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Image from revealnews.org

 

Newly released records from the California Department of Public Health show 13 people have directly died from abuse, neglect and lack of supervision since 2002 at state-run institutions for the developmentally disabled. The Center for Investigative Reporting sued the public health department in 2012 after officials there refused to release the records over patient privacy concerns. This February, the state Supreme Court ruled in favor of CIR and compelled the department to release the documents.

These documents paint the most vivid picture yet of the poor treatment sometimes experienced inside California’s five taxpayer-funded development centers, which house more than 1,100 patients. In total, the centers have been fined for their actions in the deaths of 22 people since 2002.

Read more at Reveal, CIR’s new digital platform for its investigations.

Plusnet

How can Siri help people with Autism?

One thing Apple likely didn’t expect when it released its iPhone technology is how it positively impacts people with autism. Plusnet, a British internet service provider, describes how Siri, the ultimate virtual personal assistant, presents information from queries in such a digestible way that can help people with autism process that material more easily. Read more.

The New York Times

Rhode Island Settles Case on Jobs for the Disabled

The U.S. Justice Department and the State of Rhode Island settled a “landmark case” Tuesday that will effectively halt the long-running practice of segregating people with developmental disabilities from the general workforce by placing them in sheltered workshops and adult day programs.

Federal officials said the case provides a “road map” of compliance for the civil rights of an estimated 450,000 people with intellectual and developmental disabilities across the country. Read more.