education

AZ Board of Regents committee rejects new major of Disability Studies

In a column for the Phoenix New Times NCDJ Advisory Board member Amy Silverman advocates for the creation of a Disability Studies major at Arizona universities. A sub-committee of The Arizona Board of Regents accepted requests for new majors last week and approved all the proposed majors except for Disability Studies. Silverman argues that there is a market demand for expertise related to disability issues. Click here to read Silverman’s full column.

College student diagnoses classmate with POTS, postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome

Last Friday the student newspaper Iowa State Daily featured an excellent profile of two college women who share the same invisible disability – postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS). Laura Wiederholt had been living with the condition for several years and recognized the symptoms described by her friend Taylor Schumacher. With Wiederholt’s encouragement, Schumacher received an official diagnosis and was able to adapt her lifestyle to her new condition. Apparently POTS is more common than people realize but it is underdiagnosed due to symptoms like fatigue and nausea that resemble other illnesses. Check out the article here to learn more about POTS and the students adapting to it.

DeVos & Dept of Education defend purge of “outdated” disability guides

The U.S. Department of Education and Secretary Betsy DeVos were criticized Friday after announcing news they rescinded 72 guidance documents related to education policies for students with disabilities. according to the Washington Post, the document purge was prompted by President Donald Trump’s initiative to reduce unnecessary federal government regulations. After Friday’s announcement raised alarm amongst disability and education advocates the Dept. of Education released a followup list of explanations saying the documents were “outdated, unnecessary or ineffective.” Click here to read the Washington Post’s full report.

Click here to read a full list of the 72 documents rescinded by the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services.

Arizona special-ed funding goes to schools with fewest students

A new article by Alia Beard Rau for the Arizona Republic explains how Arizona’s system for funding special education unequally benefits different schools.

“It’s a direct result of how the state funds education for students with special needs: Arizona’s spending on special education benefits schools with the fewest number of students who require it.

About one-third of Arizona students attend schools — most of which are charters — that receive more state money to serve students with special needs than those schools  actually spend for that purpose.”

NYT op-ed provides wise advice from a young author

Melissa Shang is only in 8th grade but she’s already written a highly-rated novel and led an online petition that went viral. The young, talented writer and wheelchair user recently wrote an opinion essay for the New York Times that defends her preference for a positive perspective while writing about characters with disabilities. Check out her essay ‘Stories About Disability Don’t Have to Be Sad’ by clicking here.

Univ of Illinois students with disabilities creating ‘culture house’ to build community

A group of students with disabilities at the University of Illinois are working to found a ‘cultural house’ where they can build community. The process is in its beginning stages but the founders are hopeful the new community space would create a needed space for students with disabilities to appreciate their culture and organize for more awareness of disability topics. Click here to read the full article by Karen Liu in the student paper The Daily Illini.

Students with disabilities call for social community