NPR

Accessible Designs Could Help Us All – But Only if Firms Bite

Columbia Law student Alex Blaszczuk demonstrates how accessible technology allows her to live a more independent life and enjoy many of the things she used to before a car accident left her paralyzed from the shoulders down.

In this NPR profile, Blaszczuk becomes a Google Glass explorer and is able to take pictures, find driving directions and take a camping trip with friends. Google is one of only a few big tech firms working to create accessible technologies for the disabled community. Read more.

Downtown Devil

Student doesn’t let blindness hold her back from pursuing her dreams


A girl sits on a couch, laughing and smiling frequently. Her colorful, bright dress matches her vibrant personality. A black Labrador, Olivia, is sprawled on the carpet contentedly. She’s never too far away from her owner, criminal justice sophomore Katherine Chavez.



In conversation, Katherine has a peculiar tendency to look above the head of whomever she’s speaking with, like she expects the person to be taller than he or she really is. It’s a rough subject to bring up, as if calling attention to the elephant in the room. But why does she do that?



The answer: Katherine can’t see.

The Arizona Republic

Phoenix man killed at Reno air show; leaves 3 brothers behind

The four brothers leaned on one another, and sometimes it seemed like they leaned on Mikey most – the serious one who started his own company in high school, the brave one who wrote letters to ask for things they needed, such as wheelchairs and scholarships and maybe baseball tickets – and the only one to graduate from college so far.

The Lancaster (Ohio) Eagle-Gazette

Berne Union senior adapts to life, softball with disability

It’s the best sleight-of-hand trick you’ll see on a softball field, and Alanna Sanborn has it down cold.

The Berne Union senior outfielder camps under fly balls, catches them with her left hand, and in one fluid motion tucks her glove under her right arm and comes up throwing with her left. It’s a technique that Sanborn has mastered not because she’s a show-off, but because she’s had to.